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Any feedback on this gents?
I am thinking of replacing the inner joint completely.

Is it a circlip I have to remove, or do I need to bash it off with a hammer?
 

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I am going to replace the inner joint on the RH front drive shaft.
I believe the tripod bearing is held on by a small circlip, so the job should be relatively easy.
 

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The last parts I need arrived today.
I will attack this at the weekend. I am thinking that to replace the inner joint completely I may not need to remove the hub nut.

I intend to drop the inner joint from the gearbox, clean up the grease, remove the tripod circlip. Then remove the tripod bearing, and CV boot. Fit the new boot, new tripod bearing and refit the joint back to the gearbox. Hopefully it should not take too long and the car will be good again.
 

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Now that I have my hands on the parts, the drive shaft has to come out completely to change the joint. The reason for this:
The tulip is machined in such a way that the tripod/spider will only fit in from the gearbox side so, the joint has to be fully assembled before I can press the end cap into place. This will be much easier using my hydraulic press than bashing it with a hammer whilst underneath the car.
 

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OK - a quick "How to" will follow with the photos I have.

Jack the car up, and secure on axle stands - never work with the car solely on a jack. They do fail.
Remove the wheel. You may need to loosen the wheel nuts before jacking. I don't as I have an air impact wrench.

It will look a bit like this:


Remove the split pin, and undo the nut using a 32mm socket and breaker bar or air impact wrench.



Now it is time to remove the brake caliper. Undo the two smaller attachment bolts, and secure the caliper to the strut (or similar) using wire or a cable tie. Make sure that you don't kink the hydraulic pipe. (Note that I loosely refit the fasteners from where they came from. This helps the rebuild, and also stops you losing bits).


Next, remove the caliper carrier by undoing the two larger bolts (20mm I think, but can't remember). Remove the carrier, and fit the two bolts back in. It will look like this once removed.


Now you are ready to start taking the driveshaft out. There are five bolts on the joint in the middle of the driveshaft that need to be undone if you want to leave the gearbox joint alone. To stop the wheel spinning while I undo them, I use my breaker bar and the wheel studs.


Here is a picture with all 5 of the bolts undone at the mid driveshaft joint. They are 14mm, and the best access in at the bottom, so you need to spin the shaft, crack the fasteners and then remove them one by one, turning the shaft as you go.


Next, the lower ball joint needs to be undone to pop the hub off in order to remove the driveshaft.
There is a split pin that needs to be removed, and then the nut needs to be undone with a 22mm spanner. Apologies for the poor picture quality...


Next, undo the strut to hub carrier bolts. You will need a 19mm and 17mm socket/spanner for this.


Remove the bolts, and pop the balljoint. the hub is now free to move on the tie rod, but there is enough room to get the driveshaft out.




Now it is time to rebuild the joint, so let's start stripping it down.

The dust tulip cap needs to come off, I tried prising this off, but it would not budge, so as I was replacing everything, I supported the flange of the joint with the driveshaft in a vertical position, and used the driveshaft to bash the cap off by pushing down with the shaft. I took a bit of force to knock the cap off, and you can see the dents made by the tripod bearings.


If you look closely at the picture above, you can see the circlip that needs to be removed to remove the tripod bearing. Take the clip off, hold the shaft vertically and knock the tripod bearing off with a hammer.

Remove the old boot, the tulip etc. and clean up the shaft. You will have these bits lying around, but don't throw anything out yet!


Now it is time to start assembling the joint onto the shaft.
Start by wrapping tape around the shaft to protect the new boot, and slide the boot on. Remove the tape.


Now it is time to grease up the new tripod bearing. If you look closely at the picture above, you can see the needle roller bearings. These need a bit more grease on them.



Do this is a clean place, and work some of the CV joint grease into each of the three bearings, and with this part, I did it from both sides.

Fit the new tulip (the metal body of the joint) on to the shaft, and fit the tripod onto the drive shaft and fit the retaining circlip. This is where I had a minor problem. The new circlip supplied with the kit was too big, so I refitted the old one. It is important you do it in this order, otherwise you will not be able to fit the tulip if the tripod bearing is already fitted.

Now pack out the joint with the remaining grease, ensuring there is plenty in the grooves in the tulip for the bearings, and grease on both sides.

Fit the boot into place, and secure with the new CV boot bands or cable ties. Support the joint carefully so that the new joint is uppermost, and fit the new dust cap. This can be gently hammered into place, or pressed in with a hydraulic press.

The finished item should look like this:


Not refit the shaft. reinstallation is the reverse of the removal. Don't forget to correctly torque the fasteners, and add a bit of thread lock where required.

To be honest, I was not totally impressed with the Pascal brand joint I purchased. Mostly due to the circlip being the wrong size, but the bearings in the original joint seemed better quality.

Anyway, the driveshaft is refitted to the car. The car drives well, even on full lock so I guess it is ok. Time will tell....
 

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CrossTrail said:
Quality breaker-bar you have there by the way.

A quality tool is a joy forever, unlike the bitterness of poor quality that remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.
It's not just the breaker bar. :whistle:
I totally agree about quality tools. My tool box is mostly made up of Facom, Britool and Snap-On. They are a joy to use, but most importantly, they work well and very rarely fail.
 

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If you don't have a compressor and decent air impact wrench, you may need to refit the wheel, and crack the hub nut while the car is on the ground. It is torqued up to almost 300 Nm, so doing this with the car jacked will probably just spin the driveshaft. You need a deep 32mm socket for this.

If doing the left hand driveshaft, you probably need to drain the gearbox oil before you remove the driveshaft.

I am also not sure on the process for the outer joint rebuild, but I expect it to be held in with a circlip.

The joint cost me about €60, which was much cheaper than getting it done at the garage. They would have just replaced the driveshaft with a reconditioned part anyway.
 

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It looks to me like it plugs directly into the gearbox, so you probably have to drain the gearbox oil first, and then remove the entire shaft. I would be surprised if there was not some kind of bearing/carrier part way down the shaft though.
 

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Agreed, the shaft with the Tulip on?
It looks like you have to remove the entire shaft, unless the tripod bearing will come out of the tulip. It is going to be fun keeping it clean during assembly.
 
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