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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have bought a secondhand Tunit box with loom off a x-trail but have no instructions, im not 100% sure were to fit it in the engine loom, i have a fair idea but want conformation before i fit it as i dont want to ruin the box or something worse, i have a 53 x-trail2.2d sport thanks for any help
 

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Hi Mate

If you havent fitted it yet it goes near the top off the engine on the diesel.

From birds eye view it is near the middle, Remove the 3 pin connecter and put it in place of that.

Near the Rad on top of the Engine

Hope this Helps
 

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Evannorfolk - Inotice in your autosignature that you state:
56 Plate 2.2DCI 175BHP 292FTLB Torque Super Chipped

Mine is also a 56 plate DCI but totally standard - what did you do to achieve this power increase? what did it cost and have there been any reliability problems?

PM me if you do not wish to disclose prices on the forum.

Cheers
Martin
 

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hi mate,

Sorry it took so long to reply been a while since been on the forum,

It cost £250 plus i put it on a rolling road to confirm power increase ;)

www.racechips.de

It's a german company but they really do put quality chips on the market, there are other cheaper ones but pay the extra and know you are getting quality out of it.

Very simple to fit... approx 30 seconds..... lol

But then you have about 1 hour or so getting it right!
there are 2 dials, one for how much power and the other when to kick in this extra power, you can of course turn them down to get yourself about 45mpg maybe a bit more but who wants to do that....

It will now do 0-60 in 9.1 seconds, only a second or so imrpovement of stock time but the extra torque through the gearbox is a mass improvement.

Any other questions just ask :) cheers
 

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Hi, thanks for getting back to me on this.

I have already been looking at these chips, the only thing that concerns me is will the chip induce turbo failure given that there seems to be a lot of sepeculation around the turbo's on the x-trail?

Our x-trail has only done 19k so not sure if this helps as in not a high milage motor, just don't want to have great performance for a whille & then be hit with turbo or intercooler failure.
 

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in all fairness you should be fine providing you look after her!

I.E dont thrash it on a cold engine, do your 6 miles or so gently unitll it warms up and then give it a booting!

Also the main IMPORTANT bit is to let your engine tick over for 90 seconds to 2 minutes after you have given it a thrashing to allow the oil build up in the turbo to pass through.

If you don't do this all turbo cars will get f*cked, You could buy a turbo time which basicllay keeps the engine running until it has cooled down. Great bits of kit but a waste of money in my eyes.

Hope this helps if you need pictures of how to fit it let me know and i will upload some :)
 

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The tuning box has to be installed between the common rail sensor and the engine management computer. With the ignition off and bonnet open stand over the offside wing and touch the rear corner of the silver radiator on top of the engine. This is the intercooler. Run your hand down the rear of the intercooler and it will fall on a ribbed plastic tube which carries 3 cables to the common rail, which is a metal tube running right to left across the rear of the engine. Follow the tube to its connection with the rail and you will find an electrical plug. Look at the plug on the tuning box which will be identical; you will see how to disconnect it. Replace it with the tuning box plug and then connect the plug you just removed with the connector on the other end of the tuning box. You are done. Now secure the unit and cable with some plastic ties. Make sure there is no chance of anything being caught in the fanbelt. Now drive the car and if it goes better you are done. If not, open the access panel on the tuning box and choose the next setting up (or down if economy is your aim). It should go even better. Then set the next highest setting until there is no improvement. If the setting is too high the engine may go into limp mode. If so reduce the setting to the last one that worked and wait 10 minutes before restarting. Conduct all changes with the ignition off. The tuning box fools the computer into thinking that the common rail diesel pressure, and therefore the quantity of diesel injected into the cylinders, is slightly more or less than it actually is. This is what changes the engine performance and economy. You cannot have both. More power will mean poorer fuel economy. Mine goes like a train but I only get 33 mpg. As a "responsible" nearly 50 year old I keep meaning to change it but can't seem to bring myself to. Don't worry about turbos, this is an anecdotally based popular myth, and modern turbo diesels are in fact extremely reliable.

Bit long that, sorry.
 

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All I can give is an opinion based on my own experience; I'm not saying I am right, just trying to be objective. My past is as a farmer and as such I spent a lot of time around diesels. In the 1980s tractor technology began to accelerate as turbochargers were developed as additions to extremely reliable diesel engines. Diesels were reliable because they were essentially self contained. Once started, a diesel could operate without the assistance of a battery or an electrical system. A diesel engine traditionally has a long stroke - the distance between top dead centre and bottom dead centre. This gave them high torque and a low RPM, 3,000 as opposed to 7 or 8,000 rpm for a petrol. This made them reliable, as they rotated less often in a lifetime and because the parts had to be over-engineered to withstand the high compression ignition. Turbos meant that smaller, lighter diesels could be used for the same power output. A 1980s turbo diesel required revving to 1800 rpm for 1 minute at a standstill before stopping to cool down the turbo. I cannot recall hearing of a failure in this if it was properly respected. Many farms fitted after-market turbos to standard tractors and I heard several tales of transmission and gearbox failures because of the extra power, but never the engines. The first cars were equiped with diesels at this time, and farmers were the main clients as they realised the reliability factor in a diesel engine. Unfortunately the technology didn't lend itself to automotive use as the units were naturally aspirated and very heavy. I had a 1980 Ford Grenada 2.5D and still remember the heavy steering and poor performance today. Then came modern turbos, intercoolers, "DI" direct injection, common rail and electronic engine management, all of which has transformed automotive engines, petrol and diesel. Undoubtably diesels have seen the most technological advances, and of todays units, the Nissan 2.2 dCi is a good example. As such, a modern diesel is no longer capable of running independently of a source of electricity, but modern electronics has also hauled even petrol engines to new hights of reliability when compared to the old rotating points technology. I don't believe a modern automotive diesel is intrinsically more reliable than its petrol counterpart today, but there is one hell of an advantage. Next time you're doing 70 down the motorway in your Xtrail, look at the rev counter and you'll be doing about 3,000 rpm. When you think its petrol counterpart would be doing nearly twice that, it has to be a better bet for reliability, even with any tweaking you might do. Also, the lubricant contains a detergent. Petrol lubricants don't, and allow a build-up of sludge. When you take a diesel apart, it's always a wonder how clean everything is, in spite of the oil being black. Different worlds.
 
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